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Shriners at the centre


Two of the articles featured in The Pilot this week have a common thread, that being the important impact the Shriners have made on their lives. Burn survivor Michael Gaultois has had medical treatments that would equal $2 million. Katie Rideout has been to Montreal 22 times for treatments for osteogenesis imperfecta (OI or brittle bone disease) and the Shriners hospital helped make it possible that she was able to receive some treatments at the hospital in Grand Falls-Windsor, instead of having to travel so far from home.

Two of the articles featured in The Pilot this week have a common thread, that being the important impact the Shriners have made on their lives.

Burn survivor Michael Gaultois has had medical treatments that would equal $2 million. Katie Rideout has been to Montreal 22 times for treatments for osteogenesis imperfecta (OI or brittle bone disease) and the Shriners hospital helped make it possible that she was able to receive some treatments at the hospital in Grand Falls-Windsor, instead of having to travel so far from home.

According to the Shriners website, Shriners International is a fraternity based on fun, fellowship and the Masonic principles of brotherly love, relief and truth. There are approximately 375,000 members from 191 temples (chapters) in Canada, the U.S., Mexico and the Republic of Panama.

Shriners International support Shriners Hospitals for Children, a one-of-a-kind international health care system of 22 hospitals dedicated to improving the lives of children by providing specialty pediatric care, innovative research and outstanding teaching programs. Since 1922, Shriners Hospitals for Children have significantly improved the lives of more than 865,000 children in the areas of orthopaedics, burns, spinal cord injury and cleft lip and palate. Children receive this care up to age 18 at no charge - no matter what their financial need.

The Phillips Central Shrine Club in Lewisporte is a part of the important network of Shriners chapters that make all this possible. So when you're playing Shriners TV bingo, you are helping a child have their specialized health care needs met.

When you see the local Shriners taking part in community events, these are the people who are putting forward their time and effort, along with caring and compassion to help support what Shriners does for people in this province and other parts of the world.

As Katie Rideout's mother Tina Rideout stated so clearly, when she would see the distinctive "red hat" of the Shriners through the crowds at the airport in Montreal she would say, "Thank God they're here."

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