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The seal hunt In Newfoundland and Labrador


Dear Editor, There are many within our own framework of governments who may think there are more important matters than problems with the sealing industry in Newfoundland and Labrador. Well, I beg to differ, when it comes to the livelihood of the people who depend upon the industry to feed their families. I don't need to get into the visions of activists who are not really concerned as to who needs what in this life to survive. What really bothers me is the stance taken by the Europeans who have fished in our waters off Newfoundland long before its discovery in 1497. They have the guts to stand up in their parliament and vote against the livelihood of Newfoundlanders who treated them like kings and queens over several centuries. They fished our ocean until the late 1970's when European companies decided the catch was very poor and it was too costly to have ships and crews waiting for a better bunker trip of wealth.

Letter to the editor - Dear Editor,

There are many within our own framework of governments who may think there are more important matters than problems with the sealing industry in Newfoundland and Labrador. Well, I beg to differ, when it comes to the livelihood of the people who depend upon the industry to feed their families. I don't need to get into the visions of activists who are not really concerned as to who needs what in this life to survive.

What really bothers me is the stance taken by the Europeans who have fished in our waters off Newfoundland long before its discovery in 1497. They have the guts to stand up in their parliament and vote against the livelihood of Newfoundlanders who treated them like kings and queens over several centuries. They fished our ocean until the late 1970's when European companies decided the catch was very poor and it was too costly to have ships and crews waiting for a better bunker trip of wealth.

How embarrassing it must be for European fishermen to sit at home and watch the younger generation voting against their Newfoundland friend's way of life and means of survival. How terrible it must be for those who come to Newfoundland to visit their many friends to discover their government is voting against the seal hunt. It was the European fishermen who remarked for so many years while moored up in the port of St. John's when a storm was brewing out on the fishing ground, "the seals will outnumber the codfish and other species of fish someday, and it won't be too long my friends." They were honest people who always said, "the people of Newfoundland helped to put bread and butter on their tables back home, for many years."

The European politicians have fallen for the tears of the activists. The very few who have not done good days work in their lives and only see the seal hunt as an easy way to get a fast and easy buck from supporters who really see the cute little seals on a video or in photos developed by people who have a greed for an easy living from the hard earned dollars of supporters who do not understand the reality of the sealing industry. The European politicians are in the same boat as supporters who fall for a sweet psychopathic view of Canadians being a barbaric, inhumane people out there on the Atlantic Ocean icefields swinging a weapon of destruction.

They all looked scared to death when raising their hands in disapproval of the export of seal goods to European countries. It was as if they were going to be attacked by Greenpeace and their many supporters on their way home if they didn't vote against the seal hunt, and wouldn't get to enjoy a good steak from a local farmer, who put the mallet to his cattle's head a few days before.

Now, it is up to our Prime Minister of Canada, Stephen Harper to show his real colours in supporting the livelihood of Newfoundland and Labrador fishermen, who depend upon the sealing industry for a supplement wage to feed their families and enjoy the necessary lifestyle like everyone else who want their children to have a good education and be worthwhile citizens. Europeans would not be able to cope if they were threatened by others telling their people how to live. If our Prime Minister cannot stand up for the people of Newfoundland and Labrador, he should pass the reins of his minority government onto a leader who will do so.

Mr. Prime Minister, European politicians should understand the needs of our people, and not that of the activists. It is your responsibility to defend the rights of our people.

Frank Blackwood

Richmond Hill, Ontario

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