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Flying fowl


Some chickens merely cross the road. Others go jetsetting.

Laurie LeGrow, who has a homestead on Hodgewater Line, keeps a variety of animals and describes herself on her Twitter account as a “mistress of chickens.”

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Even with that kind of devotion it was peculiar to see her tweeting Monday about how happy she was that all flights at St. John’s International Airport were on time as she had some chicks arriving on a WestJet flight.  

“I was a bit worried last week when we had the fog because when you’re talking chicks, they’re right out of the shell and they get in their travel box. Then you really need to get them where they’re going or bad things can happen,” she says.

Last year, a fox broke into her henhouse and took a few birds. Ten days later, a mink got in and did the same thing, so she decided to add some birds to her flock.

“Around here you can only get what I call basic kinds and you can occasionally fluke into getting something more different,” she says.

“We decided to get some cool chickens this time around. They are a bit more rare and not available here.”

So LeGrow contacted a business in Ontario that was willing to send chicks here. Not everybody will, since it takes longer to fly here and the risk of flights being delayed/cancelled can be risky for the chicks.

LeGrow explains that after a chick hatches, it doesn’t have to eat for a day or so, as it is still feeding on the yoke. After about a day, though, they have to get onto regular pecking chicken life.

They arrive in a cardboard box with some straw and have to be ordered in a large enough number so they keep each other warm.

Now LeGrow has some interesting chicks that will grow into even more interesting looking adults and will lay eggs coloured such that people will actually associate them more with a rabbit.

“This time around I wanted chickens that laid really cool colours for the shell,” she says.

The ameraucana breed is one such chicken.

“They’re also sometimes known as Easter egg chickens because they lay green and blue and sometimes other shades of the rainbow,” LeGrow says.

“They also have poofy cheeks. Their feathers are very poofy. Their ears are covered in feathers.”

LeGrow also bought two other breeds — barnevelder and cuckoo maran.

“They all lay really deep chocolatey brown coloured eggs.”

The birds aren’t quite as productive as regular chickens, which can produce an egg every day, but are still quite impressive with the number they pump out.

And despite the different eggshell colours, what’s inside is the same and delicious to eat. These new chicks of LeGrow’s will need some months to grow before they start to produce. All the chicks that flew down survived, although one had a leg injury and looked as though she might not make it. On Tuesday, LeGrow said she had checked and the chick seemed to have been making quite a comeback.

She plans to call that one Zombie.

Laurie LeGrow, who has a homestead on Hodgewater Line, keeps a variety of animals and describes herself on her Twitter account as a “mistress of chickens.”

RELATED STORIES:

Chickens ordered removed from Stephenville property

Urban chicken fanciers go front and centre with innovative coops

 

Even with that kind of devotion it was peculiar to see her tweeting Monday about how happy she was that all flights at St. John’s International Airport were on time as she had some chicks arriving on a WestJet flight.  

“I was a bit worried last week when we had the fog because when you’re talking chicks, they’re right out of the shell and they get in their travel box. Then you really need to get them where they’re going or bad things can happen,” she says.

Last year, a fox broke into her henhouse and took a few birds. Ten days later, a mink got in and did the same thing, so she decided to add some birds to her flock.

“Around here you can only get what I call basic kinds and you can occasionally fluke into getting something more different,” she says.

“We decided to get some cool chickens this time around. They are a bit more rare and not available here.”

So LeGrow contacted a business in Ontario that was willing to send chicks here. Not everybody will, since it takes longer to fly here and the risk of flights being delayed/cancelled can be risky for the chicks.

LeGrow explains that after a chick hatches, it doesn’t have to eat for a day or so, as it is still feeding on the yoke. After about a day, though, they have to get onto regular pecking chicken life.

They arrive in a cardboard box with some straw and have to be ordered in a large enough number so they keep each other warm.

Now LeGrow has some interesting chicks that will grow into even more interesting looking adults and will lay eggs coloured such that people will actually associate them more with a rabbit.

“This time around I wanted chickens that laid really cool colours for the shell,” she says.

The ameraucana breed is one such chicken.

“They’re also sometimes known as Easter egg chickens because they lay green and blue and sometimes other shades of the rainbow,” LeGrow says.

“They also have poofy cheeks. Their feathers are very poofy. Their ears are covered in feathers.”

LeGrow also bought two other breeds — barnevelder and cuckoo maran.

“They all lay really deep chocolatey brown coloured eggs.”

The birds aren’t quite as productive as regular chickens, which can produce an egg every day, but are still quite impressive with the number they pump out.

And despite the different eggshell colours, what’s inside is the same and delicious to eat. These new chicks of LeGrow’s will need some months to grow before they start to produce. All the chicks that flew down survived, although one had a leg injury and looked as though she might not make it. On Tuesday, LeGrow said she had checked and the chick seemed to have been making quite a comeback.

She plans to call that one Zombie.

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