A nor'easter will bring snow and strong winds

It may be spring, but a strong nor'easter with wet snow, heavy rain and strong winds will have a big impact on New Hampshire Wednesday afternoon through Thursday night. The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm warning for the entire state. Wednesday afternoon through Thursday evening. A Coastal Flood Watch is in effect along the coast Thursday morning.>> NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WARNINGS AND NOTICES TIME >> INTERACTIVE RADAR Early precipitation is expected to move into southwestern parts of the state late Wednesday morning in the form of a mild wintry mix. It should arrive in the form of wet snow over central areas by 2pm and northern areas by 4pm. Rain intensity will increase late Wednesday, especially Wednesday evening. All precipitation will increase in intensity and turn to snow overnight into Thursday, but mixing is possible near the coast. The storm will move closer to Thursday and begin to move out Thursday night. Heavy rain will end Thursday night, with some lingering light rain and snow showers possible Friday and Saturday.>> See the hourly storm timeline for the latest hours. Snow, wintry mix and wind speed: Travel conditions will be more difficult after Wednesday throughout the day Thursday. Projected amounts and types of precipitation will be a mix of snow and sleet with some heavy rain over coastal and southern areas, eventually turning to snow. In the north, it will be all snow when it arrives and will remain so for the duration of the event. Precipitation will change to snow early Thursday, even in southern areas. Expect 12-18 inches or more of snow in the eastern White Mountains, Mount Washington Valley and parts of the North Country and Lakes region. Around 12-18 inches are also possible in the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee region. 6-12 inches is possible in parts of the northern North Country, including the Upper Valley, Monadnock area and areas from Concord and Manchester to Rochester and Dover. About 3-6 inches could accumulate in southwestern parts of the state, from Nashua to Portsmouth. Lower levels are possible along the coast and in southern areas where the heavy rain and wintry mix last longer. Light rain on Friday. Other impacts include snow conditions that are heavy and wet, and power outages along with 35-40 mph winds. Winds are strongest in northern New Hampshire and some of the higher terrain and west sides of the coastal mountains, but they can be strong elsewhere. Winds will be stronger Wednesday evening through Thursday afternoon, decreasing Thursday night through Friday. With a coastal flood watch currently in effect, the storm is also causing concern along the coast. High tide at Hampton Beach at 7:41 a.m. Thursday is one to watch. As the storm crosses the coast, strong winds will blow in the east and northeast direction. Minor to moderate coastal flooding is possible with minor coastal erosion. Looking ahead After light rain on Friday, conditions will gradually improve over the weekend. Expect rain or snow showers and partly sunny spells on Saturday. So far, Monday has been quiet and mostly sunny, with parts of northern New Hampshire experiencing a total solar eclipse. Other parts of the state will witness a partial eclipse. So, make sure you have a pair of eclipse glasses handy. Stay with the Storm Watch 9 team for updates. Be aware of the weather! Download the WMUR app for Apple or Android devices and enable push notifications. You can choose to receive weather alerts based on your geographic location and/or up to three zip codes. Plus, you can get information on when precipitation is coming to your area. Get storm coverage on your smart TV with the free Very Local app. Follow the Storm Watch 9 team on social media: Mike Haddad: Facebook | XKevin Skarupa: Facebook | XHayley LaPoint: Facebook | XJacqueline Thomas: Facebook | XMatt Hoenig: Facebook | X

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It may be spring, but a strong nor'easter bringing wet snow, heavy rain and strong winds will have a big impact on New Hampshire Wednesday afternoon through Thursday night.

The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm warning for the state beginning Wednesday afternoon through Thursday evening. A coastal flood watch is in effect for Thursday morning along the coast.

>> National Weather Service warnings and bulletins

Time

Expect wet snow and a wintry mix for an extended period Wednesday morning through Thursday night.

>> Interactive Radar

Early rain is expected to move into southwestern parts of the state in the form of a mild wintry mix late Wednesday morning. It should arrive in the form of wet snow in central areas around 2pm and in northern areas around 4pm.

Rain intensity will increase late Wednesday, especially Wednesday evening. All precipitation will increase in intensity and turn to snow overnight into Thursday, but mixing is possible near the coast.

The storm will pass very close to Jupiter and begin to pull away Thursday night.

The heaviest rain should fall Thursday night, with some lingering light rain and snow possible Friday and Saturday.

>> See the latest hourly storm timeline for snow, wintry mix and wind speed:

Travel conditions will be more difficult late Wednesday through Thursday.

Projected Amounts & Types of Precipitation

Precipitation should start out as a mix of snow and sleet, before eventually turning to snow with heavy rain in coastal areas and southern communities. In the north, it will be all snow when it arrives and will remain so for the duration of the event.

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Precipitation will turn to snow early Thursday, even in southern areas.

Expect 12-18 inches or more of snow across the eastern White Mountains, Mount Washington Valley and parts of the North Country and Lakes region. Around 12-18 inches are also possible in the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee region. 6-12 inches is possible in parts of the northern North Country, the Upper Valley, the Monadnock area and areas from Concord and Manchester to Rochester and Dover. About 3-6 inches could accumulate in southwestern parts of the state, from Nashua to Portsmouth. Lower levels are possible along the coast and in southern areas where the heavy rain and wintry mix last longer.

There will be minimal additional accumulation with light rain on Friday.

Other influences

The consistency of the snow will be heavy and wet, and that combined with 35-40 mph winds will lead to scattered power outages.

Future wind

Winds will be stronger in northern New Hampshire and on the western sides of some high ground and mountains along the coast, but they will be strong elsewhere. Winds will be stronger Wednesday evening through Thursday afternoon and decrease Thursday night through Friday.

Coastal concerns in New Hampshire

The storm also caused concern along the coast, with a coastal flood watch now in effect. High tide at Hampton Beach at 7:41 a.m. Thursday is one to watch. As the storm crosses the coast, strong winds will blow in the east and northeast direction. Minor to moderate coastal flooding is possible with minor coastal erosion.

Looking ahead

After light rains move out on Friday, conditions will gradually improve over the weekend. Expect rain or snow showers on Saturday and partly sunny spells on Sunday.

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So far, parts of northern New Hampshire are looking calm and mostly sunny Monday, where the total solar eclipse will occur. Other parts of the state will witness a partial eclipse. So, make sure you have a pair of eclipse glasses handy.

Stay tuned to the Storm Watch 9 team for updates.

Be aware of the weather! Download the WMUR app for Apple or Android Enable devices and push notifications. You can choose to receive weather alerts based on your geographic location and/or up to three zip codes. Plus, you can get the word out when precipitation is coming to your area.

Get storm protection through Free most local app on your smart TV.

Follow the Storm Watch 9 team on social media:

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